Tag Archives: Diomedes

HOMER: The Iliad [Book XXIII]

In Book XXIII of Homer’s Iliad, Achilles returns to the Greek camp with Hector’s body and places it unceremoniously in the dust next to the bier of Patroclus. Then the Greeks make preparations for Patroclus’ funeral. They construct a funeral pyre on which they lay Patroclus and then Achilles sacrifices several animals and the twelve Trojans whom he took hostage during the slaughter at the river Scamander. “Patroclus, even in the house of Hades; I am now doing all that I have promised you. Twelve brave sons of noble Trojans shall the flames consume along with yourself, but dogs, not fire, shall devour the flesh of Hector son of Priam.” Continue reading HOMER: The Iliad [Book XXIII]

HOMER: The Iliad [Book X]

In Book X of Homer’s Iliad, Agamemnon summons the Greek generals after learning that Achilles did not accept his apology. The leaders decide to send scouts through the Trojan camp at night to learn the Trojan’s intentions and the composition of their army. Diomedes volunteers for this dangerous reconnaissance mission behind enemy lines and chooses Ulysses as his companion. Continue reading HOMER: The Iliad [Book X]

HOMER: The Iliad [Book VII]

In Book VII of Homer’s Iliad, the Trojan Prince Hector returns to the battlefield. His return renews the fighting and the Trojans begin to rout the Greeks. Athena, a goddess who favors the Greeks, and Apollo, a god who favors the Trojans, agree to end the fighting today by inciting Hector to challenge a Greek to a one-on-one duel. Continue reading HOMER: The Iliad [Book VII]

HOMER: The Iliad [Book VI]

In Book VI of Homer’s Iliad, Diomedes continues to massacre the Trojans. Helenus, the chief Trojan prophet, urges Hector to return to Troy and command the Trojan matrons to pray to Minerva to remove Diomedes from the battlefield. Hector heeds the prophet’s advice and retreats to the city. Continue reading HOMER: The Iliad [Book VI]

HOMER: The Iliad [Book V]

In Book V of Homer’s Iliad, the Grecian hero Diomedes enters the battle. He is wounded by an arrow, but Minerva heals Diomedes and grants him the power to discern between the mortals and the gods on the battlefield. With his new sight, Diomedes begins to attack the Trojans Pandarus and Aeneas. Diomedes kills Pandarus and then turns his attention to Aeneas. Continue reading HOMER: The Iliad [Book V]