VIRGIL: The Aeneid

Sinon Proves the Tongue is Mightier Than the Sword

            In the Aeneid, Virgil tells the story of Aeneas, a Trojan warrior who fled Troy while the Greeks “burnt the topless towers of Illium.” After fleeing the city, Aeneas sets sail and lands in Carthage, a city located in Northern Africa. There, Dido, the Queen of Carthage, hosts a banquet in honor of the Trojans. At the banquet, Aeneas recounts the sad story related to Troy’s destruction. Through Aeneas’ reminiscence, Virgil describes how the power of words ultimately precipitated Troy’s downfall.

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HIPPOCRATES: The Oath; On Ancient Medicine; On Airs, Waters, and Places; The Book of Prognostics; Of the Epidemics; The Law; On the Sacred Disease

Hippocrates is known as the “Father of Medicine.” Although many of his medical claims have been proven false, his approach to medicine was revolutionary, and it has endured to the present day. He sought for the causes of disease in natural things, such as the weather, a person’s diet, and a person’s genetics. This is a radical departure from the previous belief that illness was a punishment sent from the gods. Continue reading HIPPOCRATES: The Oath; On Ancient Medicine; On Airs, Waters, and Places; The Book of Prognostics; Of the Epidemics; The Law; On the Sacred Disease

ARISTOTLE: On the Soul [Book II, Ch. 1-3; Book III]

Aristotle claims that the soul is the form and essence of all living things. The soul is composed of many parts. All living things – plants and animals – possess a soul with a generative part, which is responsible for the nutrition and reproduction of living beings. Only animals possess a soul with a sensitive part, which enable the animal to feel pleasure and pain. Some animals possess other senses such as sight, smell, and taste. Finally, only man possess a soul with the ability to think. Continue reading ARISTOTLE: On the Soul [Book II, Ch. 1-3; Book III]

ARISTOTLE: Categories

In the Categories, Aristotle develops a classification system to assign each object known to man under one of ten categories. “Of things said without any combination, each signifies either substance or quantity or qualification or a relative or where or when or being-in-a-position or having or doing or being-affected. To give a rough idea, examples of substance are man, horse; of quantity: four-foot, fivefoot; of qualification: white, grammatical; of a relative: double, half, larger; of where: in the Lyceum, in the market-place; of when: yesterday, last-year; of being-in-a-position: is-lying, is-sitting; of having: has-shoes-on, has-armour-on; of doing: cutting, burning; of being-affected: being-cut, being-burned.” Continue reading ARISTOTLE: Categories

JAMES: Principles of Psychology [Ch. XV, XX]

Ch. XV – The Perception of Time

The late 19th century American philosopher and psychologist, William James, once wrote, “A day full of excitement, with no pause, is said to pass ‘ere we know it.’ On the contrary, a day full of waiting, of unsatisfied desire for change, will seem a small eternity.” In this lecture, we will discuss James’ thoughts upon the perception of time, as outlined in Chapter 15 of his Principles of Psychology. Continue reading JAMES: Principles of Psychology [Ch. XV, XX]

The unexamined life is not worth living.

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