Tag Archives: War

HOMER: The Iliad [Book XXII]

In Book XXII of Homer’s Iliad, the Trojans successfully retreat within the city walls thanks to Agenor’s battle with Achilles. Only the Trojan prince Hector remains outside of the city gates. King Priam and Queen Hecuba, who are watching from the ramparts, beg their son Hector to retreat into the city. “The old man tore his grey hair as he spoke. His mother hard by wept and moaned aloud. But they moved not the heart of Hector, and he stood his ground awaiting huge Achilles as he drew nearer towards him.” Continue reading HOMER: The Iliad [Book XXII]

Advertisements

HOMER: The Iliad [Book XXI]

In Book XXI of Homer’s Iliad, the entire Trojan army flees from the wrath of Achilles. Some Trojans run towards the city, some run towards the river Scamander. Achilles chases those who fled to Scamander and slaughters all but tweleve Trojans, whom he intends to offer as sacrifices to the shade of Patroclus. Continue reading HOMER: The Iliad [Book XXI]

HOMER: The Iliad [Book XX]

In Book XX of Homer’s Iliad, Jove assembles the gods. He is worried that Achilles, in his quest for revenge, will conquer Troy before the time appointed by Fate; and therefore, he rescinds his command to the gods to refrain from interfering in the war. After Jove lifts his ban, many of the gods eagerly descend to Troy in order to aid their favorite side. Continue reading HOMER: The Iliad [Book XX]

HOMER: The Iliad [Book XIX]

In Book XIX of Homer’s Iliad, Thetis brings the newly forged armor to Achilles. She finds him weeping over Patroclus. He tells her that he is worried that Patroclus’ body will decompose while he is away fighting the Trojans and avenging Patroclus’ death. Thetis puts nectar and ambrosia into the nose of Patroclus and assures Achilles that Patroclus’ body will not decompose while he is away. Then she instructs him to assemble the Greek army and inform them that his wrath towards Agamemnon has abated. Continue reading HOMER: The Iliad [Book XIX]

HOMER: The Iliad [Book XIV]

In Book XIV of Homer’s Iliad, Jove oversees the war from the top of Mt. Ida. Recall that Jove forbade all other gods from interfering in the war. To get around Jove’s prohibition, Juno contrives a plan by which she will seduce Jove in order to distract him from the war just long enough for Neptune to aid the Greeks. “She deemed that it would be best for her to go to Ida and array herself in rich attire, in the hope that Jove might become enamoured of her, and wish to embrace her. While he was thus engaged a sweet and careless sleep might be made to steal over his eyes and senses.” Continue reading HOMER: The Iliad [Book XIV]

HOMER: The Iliad [Book XIII]

In Book XIII of Homer’s Iliad, the god Neptune begins to assist the Greeks. He assumes the shape of the Greek prophet Calchas and encourages the Greek soldiers to defend their ships from the approaching Trojans. The Greek troops, led by the two Ajaxes, form a phalanx and repel the initial Trojan attack. Continue reading HOMER: The Iliad [Book XIII]

HOMER: The Iliad [Book X]

In Book X of Homer’s Iliad, Agamemnon summons the Greek generals after learning that Achilles did not accept his apology. The leaders decide to send scouts through the Trojan camp at night to learn the Trojan’s intentions and the composition of their army. Diomedes volunteers for this dangerous reconnaissance mission behind enemy lines and chooses Ulysses as his companion. Continue reading HOMER: The Iliad [Book X]