Tag Archives: Fate

HOMER: The Iliad [Book XX]

In Book XX of Homer’s Iliad, Jove assembles the gods. He is worried that Achilles, in his quest for revenge, will conquer Troy before the time appointed by Fate; and therefore, he rescinds his command to the gods to refrain from interfering in the war. After Jove lifts his ban, many of the gods eagerly descend to Troy in order to aid their favorite side. Continue reading HOMER: The Iliad [Book XX]

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HOMER: The Iliad [Book XIV]

In Book XIV of Homer’s Iliad, Jove oversees the war from the top of Mt. Ida. Recall that Jove forbade all other gods from interfering in the war. To get around Jove’s prohibition, Juno contrives a plan by which she will seduce Jove in order to distract him from the war just long enough for Neptune to aid the Greeks. “She deemed that it would be best for her to go to Ida and array herself in rich attire, in the hope that Jove might become enamoured of her, and wish to embrace her. While he was thus engaged a sweet and careless sleep might be made to steal over his eyes and senses.” Continue reading HOMER: The Iliad [Book XIV]

HOMER: The Iliad [Book XI]

In Book XI of Homer’s Iliad, dawn arrives and the opposing armies prepare for battle. Agamemnon leads the first charge of Greeks against the Trojans. He kills numerous Trojans, sending the majority of the army fleeing back to Troy. When Jove sees Agamemnon routing the Trojans, he sends his messenger Iris to the Trojan Prince Hector. Iris instructs Hector to fight defensively until Agamemnon is wounded. Then Hector can lead a charge against the Greeks. Continue reading HOMER: The Iliad [Book XI]

HOMER: The Iliad [Book I]

Homer’s Iliad begins in media res, during the tenth year of the Trojan War, which was fought between the Ancient Greeks and the Trojans. The Greeks have sacked neighboring towns around the walls of Troy and taken several women as captives. Chryseis, the most beautiful woman taken, was awarded to the Greek commander, Agamemnon. Briseis, the second most beautiful woman, was awarded to the Greek’s best fighter, Achilles. Continue reading HOMER: The Iliad [Book I]

HOMER: The Odyssey [Book XXIV]

In Book XXIV of Homer’s Odyssey, the God Mercury conducts the souls of the dead suitors to Hades. During their journey, the suitors pass by the Elysian fields where they see Agamemnon speaking to Achilles. Agamemnon relates the story of Achilles’ burial and of the funeral games held in his honor. “Thus even in death your fame, Achilles, has not been lost, and your name lives evermore among all mankind.” Continue reading HOMER: The Odyssey [Book XXIV]

HOMER: The Odyssey [Book XXIII]

In Book XXIII of Homer’s Odyssey, the nurse Euryclea informs Penelope that Odysseus has returned and killed all the suitors. Penelope does not believe her, but rather claims that some god has punished the suitors for their wickedness. Nevertheless, she agrees to descend from her room to view the outcome of the battle. Continue reading HOMER: The Odyssey [Book XXIII]