Tag Archives: Theology

HOMER: The Iliad [Book XXIV]

In Book XXIV of Homer’s Iliad, Priam departs from Troy with the intention of ransoming Hector’s corpse from Achilles. Priam’s mission is a dangerous one – the Greeks may seize and hold him as a valuable hostage. Therefore, the god Mercury conducts Priam safely and stealthily through the camp to Achilles’ tent. Continue reading HOMER: The Iliad [Book XXIV]

HOMER: The Iliad [Book XXIII]

In Book XXIII of Homer’s Iliad, Achilles returns to the Greek camp with Hector’s body and places it unceremoniously in the dust next to the bier of Patroclus. Then the Greeks make preparations for Patroclus’ funeral. They construct a funeral pyre on which they lay Patroclus and then Achilles sacrifices several animals and the twelve Trojans whom he took hostage during the slaughter at the river Scamander. “Patroclus, even in the house of Hades; I am now doing all that I have promised you. Twelve brave sons of noble Trojans shall the flames consume along with yourself, but dogs, not fire, shall devour the flesh of Hector son of Priam.” Continue reading HOMER: The Iliad [Book XXIII]

HOMER: The Iliad [Book XX]

In Book XX of Homer’s Iliad, Jove assembles the gods. He is worried that Achilles, in his quest for revenge, will conquer Troy before the time appointed by Fate; and therefore, he rescinds his command to the gods to refrain from interfering in the war. After Jove lifts his ban, many of the gods eagerly descend to Troy in order to aid their favorite side. Continue reading HOMER: The Iliad [Book XX]

HOMER: The Iliad [Book XIX]

In Book XIX of Homer’s Iliad, Thetis brings the newly forged armor to Achilles. She finds him weeping over Patroclus. He tells her that he is worried that Patroclus’ body will decompose while he is away fighting the Trojans and avenging Patroclus’ death. Thetis puts nectar and ambrosia into the nose of Patroclus and assures Achilles that Patroclus’ body will not decompose while he is away. Then she instructs him to assemble the Greek army and inform them that his wrath towards Agamemnon has abated. Continue reading HOMER: The Iliad [Book XIX]

HOMER: The Iliad [Book XVII]

In Book XVII of Homer’s Iliad, the Greeks and Trojans fight over the corpse of Patroclus. The Trojans desire to carry the corpse back to Troy in order to ransom it for the corpse of Sarpedon, whom the Greeks recently killed. The Greeks, on the other hand, naturally desire to give Patroclus a proper burial. Continue reading HOMER: The Iliad [Book XVII]

HOMER: The Iliad [Book XVI]

In Book XVI of Homer’s Iliad, Achilles and his friend Patroclus watch as the Trojans draw near to the Greek ships. Patroclus begs Achilles to allow him to don Achilles’ armor and lead the Myrmidons, which are Achilles’ troops, into battle against the Trojans in order to save the Greek ships. Achilles grants his friend’s request. He orders Patroclus to drive the Trojans from the ships, but forbids him from pursuing the Trojans to the city walls, lest Apollo, the Trojan-loving god, kill him. Achilles pours a libation to the gods for the success of Patroclus’ expedition. Then Patroclus dons Achilles’ armor and leads the Myrmidons into battle. Continue reading HOMER: The Iliad [Book XVI]

HOMER: The Iliad [Book XV]

In Book XV of Homer’s Iliad, Jove awakens to find that Juno has deceived him so that Neptune can aid the Greeks. Jove becomes furious when he sees that Hector has been knocked unconscious and that the Greeks have pushed back the Trojans. He scolds Juno and commands her to summon Iris and Apollo to him. Continue reading HOMER: The Iliad [Book XV]